Cost of Mini Dental Implants - How much do mini implants cost?

Cost of replacing a tooth?

Patients often struggle with how to pay for needed dentistry. Very often replacing missing teeth is that last thing on their mind with all the other expenses in life. Well now that cost has dropped significantly! With the new MDL mini implants from Intra-Lock and distributed by Samuel Shatkin FIRST, LLC and the F.I.R.S.T. Technique developed by Dr. Todd Shatkin, a Western NY implant dentist, a patient can come to a dentist and have one or more teeth replaced in as little as one treatment visit! Yes F.I.R.S.T (Fabricated Implant Restoration and Surgical Technique, developed and patented (USPTO #7,108,511) by Todd Shatkin, DDS utilizes miniature dental implants to immediate stabilize a replacement tooth. The Authorized Laboratory (Samuel Shatkin FIRST, LLC) produces the restoration and a surgical guide stent for dentists all across the US and abroad. Then at a single treatment procedure the dentist places the MDL implant and finished crown or bridge restoration with permanent cement on top of the MDL (Mini Drive Lock Implant). This procedure is less then ½ the typical cost of replacing missing teeth with other style implants or fixed bridgework. It is also accomplished without the need to grind down healthy tooth enamel! As your dentist if you qualify for this simple innovative procedure. Don’t be fooled by other labs claiming to be authorized to use the Shatkin procedure. Only Samuel Shatkin FIRST, LLC Laboratory is an authorized lab. For more information Patients call 866-GET-MINI’s today and Dentists call 888-4SHATKIN.

The Jameson Files Present - Dr. Todd E. Shatkin on Implantology

John Jameson - November 01, 2005

Featuring New York implant doctor Todd Shatkin Implant placement and restorative needs might be one of the top requested categories that laboratories receive today. With the evolution of implantology during the last 25 to 30 years, Dr. Todd Shatkin has become a leader of these conservative techniques, not only in regard to placement but the overall process.

Dr. Jameson: First, let’s talk about the mini-implant. What is its most significant advantage as compared to the osseointegrated implants that have been on the market for the last 15 years?

Dr. Shatkin: Since I’ve been in practice for 16 years, I have seen most of the major companies manufacturing conventional-style implants and have used many of these systems. All of these have great research and great statistical studies to show their wonderful success. The problem is trying to get patients to accept these treatment modalities can be difficult. As we know, a single conventional implant typically takes seven office visits to complete, and usually five to seven months of treatment. Usually, it involves cutting the tissue, reflecting a flap, drilling holes, and then second-stage surgery. Many of the companies now are releasing single-stage products, which have helped the situation. But still, they require multiple-office visits and extensive treatment time frames. In addition, the cost is fairly expensive since it requires one to three specialists to be involved in the treatment. About six years ago, I became affiliated with Imtec. I had been using some of their conventional implants a few years earlier, but then started using these mini dental implants for lower-denture stabilization. Following this, I used them for upper dentures when we removed the hard, plastic palate and made a horseshoe-type palate with these mini-implants and O-ring keepers. These were extremely successful. I would say the greatest advantage is that mini-implants can be done in a nonsurgical manner by making a tiny pinhole in the gum, and threading the implants into the bone. They are self-tapping and self-threading so they engage the bone immediately. Dr. Victor Sendax developed this technique more than 20 years ago, and has patents on the protocol of this denture-stabilization procedure. What’s nice is that a patient can have the procedure performed in about an hour, go home to eat dinner, and awaken the next morning with virtually no discomfort. The cost is significantly less as well.

Dr. Jameson: What specific indicators need to be in place for a doctor to find a good candidate for this type of implant?

Dr. Shatkin: You can use mini-implants in almost any location. They come in various lengths and sizes. They also can be angled easily to find bone. So, when you look at an X-ray, sometimes it looks like a sinus may be low and you may not have sufficient room. But often there is palatal bone through the sinus since you’re looking at a two-dimensional view. If you go in one way and don’t find bone, you can angle them another way and find bone. So, even if it appears on an X-ray that a patient may not be a candidate, often these implants can be used because of their small diameter. A good candidate would have to have some bone. He or she needs to be a healthy individual who’s not on a tremendous amount of medication (although you could still treat patients with steroids and blood thinners to circumvent medication issues). Bone should be of average or better density. A low-bone density doesn’t work well with these immediate-load type implants. Fortunately, though, only about one to two percent of the population has low-bone density.

Dr. Jameson: In your experience with mini-implants, you have developed a technique for working with minimal patient appointments. You have coined this technique the F.I.R.S.T. procedure. Please explain this acronym, and how you use it in your practice.

Dr. Shatkin: After having tremendous success with mini-implants in stabilizing both upper and lower dentures, I started using them for abutments in fixed crown and bridge cases. For about two years, we did this before I developed the F.I.R.S.T. procedure. What we were doing was attaching natural teeth to these implants, or doing them free-standing for abutments. If patients didn’t want to have a partial denture, we could eliminate the partial by placing mini-implants and then putting on crowns and bridges. I found that we were loading mini-implants with temporary crowns and bridges, and then a couple weeks later, placing final crowns and bridges. We had 97 to 98 percent success with the mini-implants during a period of two to three years. After these results surfaced, I decided there should be a way to fabricate a custom final crown or bridge restoration and put it on these mini-implants the day of placement. This would be the ideal. A patient could have several missing teeth replaced in 30 minutes to one hour while having the crowns and implants placed in the same visit.

This is when I developed F.I.R.S.T. It stands for Fabricated Implant Restoration and Surgical Technique. This is similar in concept to the Invisalign approach in which a doctor would take polyvinyl or rubber-based impressions of the arches, a putty-bite registration, photographs and X-rays before sending them to Dr. Samuel Shatkin and me. We then review the models, X-rays, and records to determine with the referring doctor whether the case is acceptable or not for this type of treatment. If it is acceptable, we proceed to the laboratory where we do a mock surgery on the models, place mock analog implants in the models, and have the lab fabricate a surgical stent with titanium sleeves over the implants. Once this is completed, the actual crowns and bridges are fabricated on the models as if the implants are already in place in the patient’s mouth. Next, we return the case to the doctor so he or she can place the implants and cement the crown(s) or bridge(s) on the same visit. This is my patented procedure. We also utilize an instrument, the F.I.R.S.T. Pilot Drill Guide, which helps direct the pilot drill into the middle of the cylindrical titanium sleeve so that it locates the implant in the middle of the sleeve. The dentist places the implant in the mouth via the titanium sleeve in the stent, which stays in the mouth during placement. The stent then is removed and the crowns are cemented.

Dr. Jameson: That is an amazing development. What do you think is the next phase in the future of implant development?

Dr. Shatkin: I think you are seeing already the beginning stages of what will grow in popularity. I started promoting this procedure about two years ago. Other companies now are trying to do similar things. Time will tell whether they have unique ideas, or are just copying the technique I have described. As I see it, this is the future of dental implantology. A patient will be able to come for a consultation, and have impressions taken the same day. The next time you see them, they can have implants and crowns placed. I can’t imagine anything better. In fact, I have done this procedure on my father. Since I feel so strongly about it, my family members are having the procedure done in order to replace individual teeth.

Dr. Todd Shatkin lectures internationally on the subject of mini dental implants. He developed the F.I.R.S.T. technique (patent pending), and has placed thousands of these implants for use with dentures, crowns, and bridges. He has a private practice for cosmetic and implant dentistry in Amherst, N.Y. He can be contacted at the Aesthetic Associates Center for Plastic Surgery and Dentistry at (716) 839-1700, or at Samuel Shatkin FIRST, LLC Laboratories at (716) 839-2959.

Dr. John Jameson is chairman of the board of Jameson Management, Inc., an international dental consulting firm. Representing JMI, he writes for numerous dental publications and provides research for manufacturers and marketing companies. He also lectures worldwide on the leadership and integration of technology into the dental practice. Dr. Jameson manages the technology phase of the consulting program carried out by JMI consultants in the United States, Canada, and Europe. He may be reached at (877) 369-5558, or by visiting www.jamesonmanagement.com.

Mini Dental Implants - Intra-Lock MILO Informational Dentist Video

Mini Dental Implants - Intra-Lock International introduces the new MILO Implant.

Milo™ Is a 3.0mm diameter implant with an O-ball abutment built into the implant body. It has strength characteristics that surpass normal diameter implants and it comes with a crown and bridge implant abutment so that the implant can be used for overdentures and crown and bridge restorations.

Results of Strength Testing...



YouTube Mini Implant Video

Mini Implant Interview with Dr. Todd E. Shatkin - OsseoNews II

OsseoNews: Dr. Shatkin, do you have a formula or system for deciding how many mini-implants to place? For example, in a square maxillary arch how many mini-implants would you place to replace #7-8-9-10? One mini-implant per tooth? To replace #3-4-5? Would you use a mini-implant to replace #6 if it were free standing?

Dr. Shatkin: At our clinic, we use one mini implant per anterior tooth and two for molar teeth. We routinely replace #6 and 11 with a 2.5 mm mini implant.

OsseoNews: What is the proper or ideal alignment of the mini-implant? Long axis of the tooth replaced? What would be the alignment planned for a mini-implant to replace #8, through the long axis of the cingulum of the prior natural tooth? (This question is important since many of our online subscribers are lab owners.)

Dr. Shatkin: We place the mini implant central on the available bone bissecting the buccal and lingual plates. Occasionally we use a custom abutment to angle the implant lingually. Typically we use a surgical guide stent provided by Samuel Shatkin, DDS, MD and his laboratory.

OsseoNews: What kind of abutment interface do you have for cementing a crown or fixed partial denture? The most commonly displayed mini-implant has a ball at the coronal end and a square neck directly subjacent.

Dr. Shatkin: We cement the crown directly to the ball and square on the implant. The crown is like a pontic with a cylindrical hole under it. We use a resin cement.

OsseoNews: As you know, a real hot topic is maxillary overdentures.

In your Amherst practice, do you use the mini-implants to support a bar or would you use free-standing? Also, how many for each?

Dr. Shatkin: We customarily use 6-8 Mini's with o-balls to support a full upper denture with o-rings. These procedures are great because they require no flap, no sutures, little post-op discomfort and immediate results the same day as placement. I have personally placed over 5,000 Mini's in the past six years and have had 95% success.

OsseoNews: It appears to me that you’re on the cutting edge with your F.I.R.S.T. technique. I believe that immediate placement and immediate temporarization or permanent restoration is the key. With your system it appears the dental lab does most of the work. I really like your approach.

Dr. Shatkin: We assist dentists in treatment planning, selecting the appropriate implant for placement, occlusion analysis, etc. A dentist who’s been trained in one of my seminars sends us the polyvinyl impressions, a bite registration and a panoramic x-ray, along with details as to shade etc., and we do the rest. The F.I.R.S.T. technique and service to the industry is really taking off. With a minimum amount of promotion, we now have about 750 dentists regularly using our services and we are growing every day. There is a huge need for immediate implant and crown services from the dental profession. There has been a huge swing in favor of placing mini's in the anterior mandible to support an overdenture, and I’ve enjoyed immense success with that service. However, I think that use of these devices in other treatment situations may represent the next stage in the evolution of the approach to implants. I encourage all dentists to begin providing

these simple, cost-effective methods of tooth replacement.

OsseoNews: You had a F.I.R.S.T. two-day seminar in Las Vegas last fall that from all reports was successful. Tell me about it and when another one’s planned.

Dr. Shatkin: We had over 75 doctors enroll in the course and the evaluations were extremely favorable. Most of those enrollees are now routinely accepting single tooth and crown/bridge cases utilizing the F.I.R.S.T. technique. We’re going to have another one in Baltimore on August 19/20. It will be a two-day symposium on the mini implant for use with denture stabilization as well as for use with single and multiple crowns and for full arch reconstruction. The course is August 19 and 20th and will be held at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront. The enrollment fee is $1,295 and includes 14 hours AGD CE.

* Todd Shatkin Says: December 19th, 2007 at 10:03 pm Dear Friends and Readers, I have not posted in a while but I want you all to know that Samuel Shatkin FIRST, LLC Laboratory is offering the Intra-Lock MDL (Indicated for Long Term Use). This product in my opinion and the opinion of many dentists who have switched to the MDL is a superior product to a 1.8 mm design. They are significantly stronger then a 1.8 mm because they are available in a 2.0 and a 2.5 mm design. There is also the MILO implant which is a 3.0 mm implant. The patented delivery system allows an easier placement with or without the use of the surgical motor. After placing well over 5000 mini implants I can honestly say this system is superior to any other mini implant system I have used. For more information on the MDL mini implant system please feel free to contact Jay Moore at Samuel Shatkin FIRST, LLC 888-4Shatkin or visit www.shatkinfirst.com

p.s. Of course Samuel Shatkin, DDS, MD continues to assist dentists in treatment planning cases, fabrication of surgical stents for crowns, bridges and dentures using the mini implants and also provides a full service laboratory offering all aspects of crown and bridge and denture lab requirements.

Mini Implant Interview with Dr. Todd E. Shatkin - OsseoNews

Osseonews: Dr. Shatkin you have been at the cutting edge in mini-dental implants. What do you think is the most significant advantage to the mini-implant?

Dr. Shatkin: The most significant advantage of the mini-implant is that it is a simple procedure for the doctor and patient, it is cost effective and requires no flap or suturing in most cases. Furthermore, the mini-implant can be restored with a permanent crown or bridge restoration at the time of placement if the F.I.R.S.T. procedure is utilized.

Osseonews: Could you describe the placement and exactly what makes it so simple?

Dr. Shatkin: You place a surgical guide stent with a titanium tube that guides the site and angulation of the pilot drill. An additional Pilot Drill guide is used to angle the drill in the proper direction. The implant is inserted through the tube as well. This ensures perfect placement. The stent is removed for the final torquing of the implant. No need to lay a flap or used guide pins. The stent is made on diagnostic casts. I have developed and patented a system for this called the Fabricated Implant Restoration and Surgical Technique (FIRST).

Osseonews: Could you describe the protocol for restoring a mini-dental implant with a crown?

Dr. Shatkin: The laboratory uses the same guide stent to make the crown. The path of insertion of the crown is along the same axis as the implant. The laboratory makes the crown to insert exactly in line with the implant. Essentially all you have to do is remove the stent and do the final torquing of the implant and then insert the crown. In less than 30 minutes a single implant and lab fabricated fixed crown can be completed and cemented permanently. In about an hour a 3 unit case can be finished and in 3 hours, an experienced implant dentist can place and restore an entire arch of implants and crowns.

Osseonews: Could you describe the configuration of the mini-dental implants.

Dr. Shatkin: The mini-implants are 2.0 - 2.5 mm in diameter and come in 10,11.5, 13, 15 and 18mm lengths. The 13mm and 15mm are the most commonly used. There are two styles of implant configuration. The mini-implant has a ball head, a square polished neck and a polished collar.

Osseonews: What is the orientation of the correctly inserted mini-implant?

Dr. Shatkin: The ball should be set about 3-4mm above the gingival tissue.

Osseonews: What are the indications for selecting the mini-dental implant?

Dr. Shatkin: We have used the mini-implants to support single crowns, fixed partial dentures and overdentures. There are few contraindications for selecting a mini-implant. For example if you are placing an implant immediately after an extraction, the mini-implant may be too narrow for predictable healing. You might select a wider conventional implant for that kind of a situation.

Osseonews: Do you feel that most general dentists could be comfortable placing and restoring the mini-implants?

Dr. Shatkin: Absolutely. I am a general dentist and I have placed and restored thousands of mini-implants. As long as you have the proper training and background, you should be able to place and restore these.

OsseoNews: Do you have a formula or system for deciding how many mini-implants to place. For example, in a square maxillary arch how many would you place to replace #7-8-9-10?

Dr. Shatkin: In general we use 1 mini per anterior tooth and 2 mini’s for each molar. For example for replacing #7-10 we would use four Mini's. For replacing A maxillary canine we would use a 2.5mm mini.

OsseoNews: What is the proper or ideal alignment of the mini-implant? Long axis of the tooth replaced? What would be the alignment planned for an mini to replace #8? Through long axis of the cingulum of the prior natural tooth?

Dr. Shatkin: We place an mini to replace a maxillary central incisor on the available bone bissecting the buccal and lingual plates. Occasionally we use a custom abutment to angle the implant lingually.

OsseoNews: What kind of abutment interface do you have for cementing a crown or fixed partial denture. The most commonly displayed mini has a ball at the coronal end and a square neck directly subjacent.

Dr. Shatkin: We cement the crown directly to the ball and square on the implant. The crown is like a pontic with a cylindrical hole under it. We use a resin cement.

OsseoNews: For a maxillary overdenture do you use mini's to support a bar or would you use free-standing. How many for each.

Dr. Shatkin: We generally do not use a bar but prefer free standing mini's. We use 6-8 mini’s with the o-balls to support a maxillary complete overdenture with o-rings.

* Todd Shatkin Says: December 19th, 2007 at 10:03 pm Dear Friends and Readers, I have not posted in a while but I want you all to know that Samuel Shatkin FIRST, LLC Laboratory is offering the Intra-Lock MDL (Indicated for Long Term Use). This product in my opinion and the opinion of many dentists who have switched to the MDL is a superior product to a 1.8 mm design. They are significantly stronger then a 1.8 mm because they are available in a 2.0 and a 2.5 mm design. There is also the MILO implant which is a 3.0 mm implant. The patented delivery system allows an easier placement with or without the use of the surgical motor. After placing well over 5000 mini implants I can honestly say this system is superior to any other mini implant system I have used. For more information on the MDL mini implant system please feel free to contact Jay Moore at Samuel Shatkin FIRST, LLC 888-4Shatkin or visit www.shatkinfirst.com

p.s. Of course Samuel Shatkin, DDS, MD continues to assist dentists in treatment planning cases, fabrication of surgical stents for crowns, bridges and dentures using the mini implants and also provides a full service laboratory offering all aspects of crown and bridge and denture lab requirements.